Stacks Image 3085
Enter the name for this tabbed section: 2013

Dr Darla Castelli
2013 Jennifer Wall Keynote Address

“P
hysical Activity Programming Through the Years: From Accountability to Coordinated Approaches,
What is Most Appropriate for Today's Children?

Stacks Image 1557
This presentation focuses on the role of schools, and physical education, in particular, in promoting active lifestyles and the extent to which this contributes to public health. To date, the effectiveness of school PE in this area has been somewhat limited. Some of the reasons for this are beyond the control of the subject/profession such as the reduced requirement for physical activity in life generally, competing (and more sedentary) leisure-time activities within and beyond the school setting, and limited (or reducing) PE time/resources in schools. In addition, it is recognised that behaviour change and social reform is highly complex and that there are no quick or easy fixes to activating a nation. However, if PE is serious about its contribution to public health (and is to be taken seriously), it needs to consider doing more than it currently does to promote active lifestyles. For, whilst the rhetoric from physical educators suggests that PE should involve the promotion of active lifestyles, what is less clear is how this is achieved and the extent to which it is prioritised. A summary of what is known from research on health-related PE and consideration of a number of health-related models and approaches will be drawn upon to propose recommendations for physical educators and physical education teacher educators to help maximise PE's effectiveness in promoting active lifestyles.


Conference Documents


Workshop Handouts


Conference Pictures

@import((2013 Pictures))
Enter the name for this tabbed section: 2012

Dr Jo Harris
2012 Jennifer Wall Keynote Address

“How well does PE promote active lifestyles?
Recommendations for physical educators and physical education teacher educators”

This presentation focuses on the role of schools, and physical education, in particular, in promoting active lifestyles and the extent to which this contributes to public health. To date, the effectiveness of school PE in this area has been somewhat limited. Some of the reasons for this are beyond the control of the subject/profession such as the reduced requirement for physical activity in life generally, competing (and more sedentary) leisure-time activities within and beyond the school setting, and limited (or reducing) PE time/resources in schools. In addition, it is recognised that behaviour change and social reform is highly complex and that there are no quick or easy fixes to activating a nation. However, if PE is serious about its contribution to public health (and is to be taken seriously), it needs to consider doing more than it currently does to promote active lifestyles. For, whilst the rhetoric from physical educators suggests that PE should involve the promotion of active lifestyles, what is less clear is how this is achieved and the extent to which it is prioritised. A summary of what is known from research on health-related PE and consideration of a number of health-related models and approaches will be drawn upon to propose recommendations for physical educators and physical education teacher educators to help maximise PE's effectiveness in promoting active lifestyles.


Conference Documents


Conference Pictures

@import((2012 Pictures))
Enter the name for this tabbed section: 2011

Dr Hans van der Mars
2011 Jennifer Wall Keynote Address

“Physical Educators Assessing Student Learning: It's Now or Never"


This presentation will be focused on the assessment function of Physical Education teachers, specifically the formal assessment of student learning. In the first part of this presentation I will argue that school Physical Education continues to be devoid of any culture of assessment, offer the reasons for that, and the likely consequences. Second, I will place the need for formal assessment of learning in the context of standards-based instruction, and the accountability mechanisms currently in place for demonstrating program impact. This will include a review of current thinking about “Assessment for Learning” and “Assessment of Learning.” Third, I will highlight the importance of aligning outcomes, instruction and assessment. Then, in the second half of the presentation I bring this to life by addressing the need for creating authentic learning contexts for conducting formal assessments. I will then contrast the traditional approach to formal assessment with an alternative evidence-based approach to building it into day-to-day teaching. Having a sound classroom management system and providing students with time to learn constitute two key prerequisite conditions that must be in place for on-going formal assessment to have a chance to flourish. I will close by presenting some data that will show that formal assessment of relevant outcomes is well within reach for Physical Education teachers.

Stacks Image 1670

Dr. Hans van der Mars received his doctoral degree from The Ohio State University (1984).  He is a Full Professor at Arizona State University, where he is actively involved in the undergraduate, master’s and doctoral degree programs in Physical Education Teacher Education-Sport Pedagogy.  Previously he held a faculty appointment at Oregon State University for 15 years.  While there, he taught in the professional Physical Education Teacher Education licensure program, directed the Sport Pedagogy Laboratory, advised a small cadre of doctoral students, and also served as Graduate Program Coordinator.  Prior to his tenure at Oregon State University, he held faculty positions at Arizona State University (Tempe) and the University of Maine-Orono.

He has been an active researcher in Sport Pedagogy/Physical Education Teacher Education for over 23 years.  He has (co-)authored and published over 65 research papers, professional papers, book chapters and Proceedings papers.  His published works have appeared in theJournal of Teaching in Physical Education(JTPE), Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly (APAQ), Pediatric Exercise Science (PES),Physical Educator, Strategies, Paleastra, Journal of Sport Pedagogy , Research Quarterly for Exercise & Sport (RQES), andEducational Leadership.  In 2011, he co-authored the second edition of “Complete Guide to Sport Education” and has served as Co-Editor of the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education (JTPE).  Dr. van der Mars has made over 115 invited, keynote, research and professional presentations at international, national regional and state level conferences.  And he also regularly delivers workshops for K-12 teachers in physical education.

Dr. van der Mars is a Fellow in the Research Consortium of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education & Recreation (AAHPERD), and was inducted as an Active Fellow in the American Academy of Kinesiology & Physical Education (AAKPE) in 2006.  In 2009 he was awarded Fellow status in the North American Society of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport, and Dance Professionals, and named Southwest District Scholar in AAHPERD’s Southwest District of AAHPERD.  In 2010 he received the Presidential Citation in the Southwest District of AAHPERD, while in 2011 he received the Physical Education Teacher Education Honor Award from the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE), was appointed to the President’s Council on Fitness, Sport and Nutrition Science Board for a three-year term.  In his free time he enjoys spending time with his wife Joanne and their daughter Katelyn, playing golf


Conference Documents


Conference Pictures

@import((2011 Pictures))
Enter the name for this tabbed section: 2010

Dr Mary O’Sullivan
2010 Jennifer Wall Keynote Address

“Creating and Supporting Communities of Practice
Among Physical Education Professionals”

The focus of this presentation is on the role of continuing professional development for physical education teachers. The presentation will address key issues in the provision, purpose, design, delivery, and evaluation of high quality professional development over a teacher’s lifetime. The first part of the presentation will address the increasing calls internationally for greater resources for the professional development of teachers. I will outline some of the shifting perspectives of the focus and delivery of professional development initiatives. A section of the presentation will review the recently completed Consensus Statement on Continuing Professional Development (CPD) by members of the International Association for Physical Education in Higher Education and the potential for this document to support and influence the practices and policies around the delivery of physical education and Physical Education professional development by government departments of education, professional Physical Education associations, university professors of Physical Education and Physical Education teachers’ working lives. I will describe some examples of best practices in international CPD focussing on the concepts of induction, mentoring, and communities of practice in particular. The final section of the presentation includes a list of evidence based principles in the design of high quality CPD and how we can learn from existing research and contemporary best practices in physical education and education more generally.

Stacks Image 1015

Professor Mary O'Sullivan joined the PESS department in 2005 and is currently the Dean of the Faculty of Education and Health Sciences. Prior to joining the PESS department, Mary was an Associate Dean for the College of Education at Ohio State University. Since joining the University of Limerick, Professor O'Sullivan has founded the Physical Education, Physical Activity and Youth Sport (PEPAYS) Research Centre  at the University of Limerick which has a growing group of postgraduate students and researchers conducting research related to physical education, youth sport, and physical activity.  Mary graduated from the University of Limerick (then Thomond College of Education) with a BA in 1976, and subsequently was awarded a Master of Arts degree from the University of Victoria, Canada in 1980 and a PhD from Ohio State University in 1983. A primary focus of Professor O'Sullivan's research has been researching aspects of teaching and teacher education and it relationship with quality physical education and improving students' attitudes toward and participation in physical activity and healthy lifestyles. A second emphasis has been life history research of teachers and children's narratives on sport and physical education and  drawing implications for the  design and delivery of school and community physical activity programmes.  Professor O'Sullivan has published extensively in peer reviewed journals and has published a book and monographs in the area of Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy.


Conference Documents


Workshop Handouts

Stacks Image 1606
What's In Your Lunch? by Sherri Gurney and Leana Smith

Stacks Image 1617
Commit To Get Fit. by Kelly Butler


Conference Pictures

@import((2010 Pictures))
Enter the name for this tabbed section: 2009

Dr. Leonard Epstein
Jennifer Wall Keynote Address

“Behavioral Choice Theory and Obesity”

Becoming obese involves a series of choices to consume high energy dense foods rather than lower energy dense foods and the choice to be sedentary rather than be active. Behavioral choice theory will be used to provide a multilevel analysis of how choice is related to obesity. Research will be reviewed that includes neuroscience, the neurobiology of reward, dopamine genetics, randomized clinical trials to treat and prevent obesity with the focus on reducing sedentary behavior, and the influence of taxes and subsidies on food purchases, all from the perspective of behavioral choice theory. The importance of choice in understanding and changing behavior is emphasized.

Stacks Image 870

Dr. Leonard H. Epstein is an internationally recognized authority in the fields of childhood overweight, physical activity, weight control, and family intervention. He is a Distinguished Professor with the Department of Pediatrics and Social and Preventive Medicine at the University of Buffalo as well as the Chief of the Division of Behavioral Medicine. For the past 25 years, Dr. Epstein has conducted research relevant to the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity, including mechanisms that regulate intake and energy expenditure in children. He is a fellow in numerous scientific organizations, and has been the President of the division of Health Psychology, APA, and recipient of the American Psychological Association Award for Outstanding Contributions to Health Psychology. Dr. Epstein chaired the Behavioral Medicine Study Section, NIH, and served on the Advisory Board for Center for Scientific Research, NIH. He has a B.A. in Psychology from Lafayette College and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Ohio University. Dr. Epstein’s research interests focus on health behavior change and determinants of eating, physical activity, and drug self-administration. He has published over 300 articles in refereed journals, 39 chapters or invited reviews and 3 books.


Conference Documents


Conference Pictures

@import((2009 Pictures))
Enter the name for this tabbed section: 2008

Dr. Mike Metzler
Jennifer Wall Keynote Address

"Instructional Models as Blueprints for Teaching Physical Education"

An instructional model refers to a comprehensive and coherent plan for teaching that includes: a theoretical foundation, statements of intended learning outcomes, teacher’s content knowledge expertise, developmentally appropriate and sequenced learning activities, expectations for teacher and student behaviors, unique task structures, measures of learning outcomes, and mechanisms for assessing the faithful implementation of the model itself.
Using a recognizable metaphor, an instructional model can be considered a comprehensive blueprint for an instructional unit, one that provides a teacher with a clear picture of what is trying to be accomplished (learned), a content progression plan, learning activities, benchmarks that describe teacher and student engagement patterns, and assessments that match stated learning outcomes.
In the past decade several innovative instructional models have been designed for use in physical education programs for young children to adults, and for a wide rage of content. Some of those models have been developed outside of physical education and adapted for use in that subject: Direct Instruction, Cooperative Learning, Peer Teaching, Inquiry Teaching, and Personalized Systems of Instruction. Other models have been designed specifically for physical education instructional units: Tactical Games, Sport Education, and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility.
This keynote address will: 1) provide an introduction to the concept of Models-Based Instruction in physical education; 2) briefly explain each of the mentioned models with examples of how they have been used, and; 3) demonstrate the process of deciding which model can be used most effectively for an instructional unit.

Stacks Image 839

Dr. Mike Metzler is a renowned international speaker, author, and teacher educator. He is currently a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health at Georgia State University. From 2003 to 2008 he served as the Associate Dean for Academic Programs in the College of Education with responsibilities in the areas of program assessment, accreditation, and graduate research. He served concurrently as Associate Dean and Chair of the KH Department in 2004-05.
Dr. Metzler holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Education from Tufts University, a Master of Science degree from East Stroudsburg University in Physical Education, and a Ph.D. degree from the Ohio State University in Physical Education Teacher Education with a cognate in Applied Behavior Analysis. His first higher education position was at Iowa State University, followed by 13 years at Virginia Tech, before arriving at GSU in 1994.
His teaching expertise is in the areas of instructional models for physical education, research methods for teaching and teacher education, student teaching supervision, and the history and principles of physical education. His areas of research and scholarship are focused on various aspects of physical education teacher education: research on teaching and instructional models; and research on teacher education programs, with an emphasis on program assessment.
Dr. Metzler has authored or co-authored nine books, most notably Instructional Models for Physical Education, now in its second edition. He has published over thirty refereed research and topical articles in journals like JTPE, Journal of Teacher Education, and Quest. In 2005, he was selected as the Honor Award recipient for career contributions from the Curriculum and Instruction Academy of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education.
He was one of the founding co-editors of JTPE in 1981, which is now the leading research journal in physical education teaching and teacher education. Dr. Metzler has served as a consultant or external reviewer for physical education teacher education programs in Singapore, Japan, Turkey, and Israel.


Conference Documents


Enter the name for this tabbed section: 2007

Dr. Thom McKenzie
Jennifer Wall Keynote Address

“Increasing Youth Physical Activity: Thinking Outside of the Box”

The APEQ 2007 organizing committee is pleased to announce Dr. Thom McKenzie as our keynote speaker. The title of his presentation will be “Increasing Youth Physical Activity: Thinking Outside of the Box”. This presentation will encourage physical educators to be aware of non-school influences on physical activity since children accrue approximately 80% of their physical activity off school property. Dr. McKenzie reviews contemporary research to explore community connections, including school location, active transport to school, community design, public parks, home environments, and family interactions. During the talk, he will allude to the BOX as the gym, and expand on the notion that physical educators should not only teach quality PE but also consider other environments where youth gain their physical activity experience.

Born in Canada, Dr. Thom McKenzie is Emeritus Professor of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences at San Diego State University. Before moving to California, Dr. McKenzie worked as a physical education teacher, coach, and assistant principal. He is a world leader in designing and assessing physical activity programs for diverse populations. Among his accomplishments, Dr. McKenzie has received the International Olympic Committee President’s Prize, a top international award for his significant contribution to pedagogy. He has authored or co-authored over 130 scientific papers, and has been an investigator on nine multidisciplinary research projects supported by the National Institutes of Health. He is currently Co-Principal Investigator on two obesity prevention programs in San Diego and a study of physical activity in parks and recreation centers in Los Angeles. Dr. McKenzie is also co-founder of the Sports, Play and Active Recreation for Kids (SPARK) programs, which have been implemented in more than 2,000 K-12 schools in 30 states.


Conference Documents


Conference Pictures

@import((2007 Pictures))
Enter the name for this tabbed section: 2006

Dr. David Kirk
Jennifer Wall Keynote Address

"From Theory to Practice: Discovering the educational benefits of Sport Education in a primary school in the UK"


The presentation begins with a brief description of the main educational benefits and main features of the Sport Education pedagogical model. Sport Education was first developed by Daryl Siedentop of the Ohio State University and his colleagues through the 1980s. By the 1990s it was being adopted across the world. The main educational benefits of Sport Education are to produce competent, literate, and enthusiastic players. It does this through incorporating the main features of sport, including seasons, affiliation, formal competition, a culminating event, festivity, record keeping, and persisting groups. Children take on roles in addition to players, including those of team captain, coach, manager, referee, warm up officer, equipment officer, statistician, and journalist. The presenter will also summarize the main findings concerning research on Sport Education, focusing in particular on the main educational benefits claimed for the model.

Following this outline of the theory of Sport Education, the presentation shifts its attention to practice. Background information is provided on Mountfields Lodge Primary School and the Year 5 and 6 groups (children ages 10-12) and their teachers. The school first implemented Sport Education in the 1999/2000 academic year, and the programme is now in its sixth year. Aspects of the development of the programme and its implementation over time are discussed, with a particular focus on the challenges the school had to meet to make the programme work. Video clips of teachers and students are used to illustrate the main educational benefits of Sport Education at this school, including team work and affiliation, confidence, competence, knowledge, enthusiasm, leadership and a range of literacy and numeracy skills flowing into other parts of the curriculum. The presentation concludes with the teachers’ views on what it takes for Sport Education to succeed in schools.

Stacks Image 779

Professor Kirk joined the University of Bedfordshire in June 2009 as Alexander Chair in Physical Education and Sport. The Chair is named in honour of Eileen Alexander, former Principal of Bedford College of Physical Education and founder of the Alexander Trust. In 2009-2010 Professor Kirk was Director of the Institute for Sport and Physical Activity Research and is currently Acting Director of IREd.
He has held academic appointments in Australia between 1984 and 1998 at Deakin University and the University of Queensland, and from 1999 to 2005 at Loughborough University. Most recently he was Dean of the Carnegie Faculty of Sport and Education and Pro Vice Chancellor (Research) at Leeds Metropolitan University.
He is currently Visiting Professor at the University of Queensland and was Guest Professor in the Department of Sport and Movement Sciences at the University of Ghent in Belgium in 2008-9.


Conference Documents


Conference Pictures

@import((2006 Pictures))
Enter the name for this tabbed section: 2005

Dr. Louise Humbert
Jennifer Wall Keynote Address

"Opportunity knocks: Opening the door to a lifetime of physical activity"

The vital role that physical activity plays in enhancing the health and well being of children and youth of all ages has been well documented. However, current estimates indicate that the majority of Canadian children and youth are inactive. In addition, girls are less active than boys, young women are less active than young men, and this gender difference appears to track across the lifespan. School physical education classes and physical activity programs can play an integral role in enhancing the physical activity levels of all children and youth and in particular girls and young women. For many girls and young women, physical education classes may be the only opportunity they have to acquire the skills, attitudes, and knowledge needed to lead a physically active lifestyle. As physical educators we have an incredible opportunity to use our knowledge and our love of movement to open the door to a lifetime of physical activity for girls and young women. Opportunity truly does knock on the door of physical educators. We are challenged to respond with programs that will positively influence girls and young women today and in the future? What a challenge . . . what an opportunity!

Stacks Image 553

Dr. Humbert is an Associate Professor in the College of Kinesiology at the University of Saskatchewan. Prior to her appointment, she taught physical education and health for 10 years in Saskatoon. Dr. Humbert is the chair of the Saskatchewan In Motion school task force, and was named Woman of Influence by the Canadian Association for the Advancement of Women in Sport and Physical Activity in 2003. In May of this year, Dr. Louise Humbert was also named the CAHPERD Scholar.


Conference Documents


Conference Pictures

@import((2005 Pictures))
Enter the name for this tabbed section: 2004

Dr. Jean Côté
APEQ Keynote Address

“The Building Blocks of Recreational Sport Participation and Elite Performance”

The lack of physical activity among Canadians has been regarded by government policy makers as a concern that needs to be addressed. Physical education, school sports, recreational sports, and performance sports programs are the foundation of both recreational activity and sport performance among youths. Because these programs often have different goals and objectives they are usually conducted independently, which is expensive and ineffective. By having physical education and sport programs focusing on the common building blocks that all young people need, we can reduce the costs and increase the benefits associated with sport and physical activity participation and performance. Côté and his colleagues have developed a model of children’s development in sport that highlights common building blocks to both recreational and elite sports. The model predicts that participation in sports, at the elite or recreational levels, is best predicted by a sampling of various sporting activities and a high amount of involvement in “deliberate play” activities during the early stage (age 6-12) of an athlete’s development.

My research interests focus on the developmental and psychosocial factors that affect sport and physical activity performance and participation. I am interested in the complex interaction of children, parents and coaches in the development of talent and in the achievement of personal excellence. The purpose of my research is to identify variables and behaviors within family, performers and coaches that create favorable conditions for excellence and participation in sports. This program of research uses various qualitative and quantitative methodologies including unstructured and structured interviews, observation, video-task analysis, and questionnaires.


Conference Documents

Enter the name for this tabbed section: 2003

Larry Smith
APEQ Keynote Address

“Building The Program”

Challenged by the hurdles you face when trying to change or develop your program? Larry has built success into teams and business. Enjoy his experiences, find out how he reached his goals and learn from his tips for success.

Stacks Image 436

Smith is one of the most recognized sports figures in Quebec. Montreal fans first got to know him as a star running back for the Als from 1972 through 1980, and then as the team’s President and CEO from 1997 to 2001 and from 2004 through today.
His first term as the president of Alouettes followed five years as commissioner of the Canadian Football League. He has worked tirelessly for professional and amateur football over the last 30 years, playing a key role in reviving the tradition and glory of football in Montreal and Quebec as a whole.
As a player, he was part of two Grey Cup championship teams, 1974 and ’77. The Alouettes’ first-round selection in the 1972 Canadian college draft, he played 140 consecutive regular-season games, along with 13 playoff and five Grey Cup games. He is still to this day the only player ever picked by the Alouettes with the first-overall selection in the CFL Canadian Draft.
He has held several executive positions with major firms since graduating from Bishop’s University, including with John Labatt Ltd. (Ogilvie Mills Ltd).
He has received numerous honours throughout his business career: He was named the 1994 American Marketing Association-Toronto chapter Marketer of the Year (consumer products); Sports Personality of the Year at the 1998 Quebec Sports Gala; Marketer of the Year in 1999 by the International Association of Professional Communicators (Montreal); received the Accomplishment Award at the 2000 Marketing Personality Gala; the Equinoxe-Homage Award from the Société des relationnistes du Québec in 2002; the Integrated Marketing (Large Company) Award from the Association Marketing de Montreal in 2003; and the McGill Management Achievement Award in 2009. In 2010, he was named to l’Ordre national du Québec with the title of Chevalier du Québec.
In 2001, he received the Commissioner’s Award for his outstanding service and dedication in preserving and promoting the CFL. This award came during 2001 Grey Cup Week in Montreal, which was a huge success under his direction.
Montreal again hosted the Grey Cup in 2008, for which he served as Committee Co-Chairman. The event was a huge success with over 66,000 fans packing Olympic Stadium to the rafters.
He serves on a number of civic charitable boards and has served as president of the Bishop’s Alumni Association and is Chairman of the Canada Games Council board of directors. In 2009, he was named to the Canadian Olympic Committee.
He lives in Hudson, QC, with his wife Leesa. They have three children, Wes, Ashley, and Brad, who was a standout receiver at Queen’s University and was drafted by the Toronto Argonauts in 2007, as well as two young grandchildren, Drew and Hunter.


Conference Documents